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The Countess Free Church, Ely
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Woodmancote Evangelical Free Church, Woodmancote
 

Copthorne Chapel

War memorial


William Thomas Mitchell

 
 

In Memory of
Private William Thomas MITCHELL
SD/1136, 11th Bn., Royal Sussex Regiment
who died age 20 on 21 October 1916
Son of William and Jane Mitchell, of Bruce Cottage, Copthorne, Crawley.

Native of Crawley Down, Sussex.
Remembered with honour
MILL ROAD CEMETERY, THIEPVAL Grave reference XVIII.D.7

 

E.A. Arnold

E.T. Brackpool

W.F. Brooker

A. Daniels

W.R.Habgood

F.R. Harding

P. Locke

W. Langridge

Back to Memorial Page

 

J.C. Gerrard.

J. Mason

W. Mason

A. Mitchell

W. T. Mitchell

E.S. Plaws

F. Stevens

J. Tester

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  Location information: Thiepval is a village on the D151 road about 8 kilometres north of the town of Albert. The Cemetery (signposted at Thiepval) is about 1kilometre north-west of the village on the north side of the D73 road to Hamel. Access to the cemetery, 500 metres from the road, is by a track (suitable for cars).  
  Historical Information: The German Army took the area around Thiepval at the end of September 1914. It then established a line through the area with troops from its 26th Reserve Division. Men from this Division were still in occupation when Commonwealth forces launched their assault on the 1 July 1916. During this attack, the 36th (Ulster) Division were detailed to attack the German positions north of Thiepval. Launched from Thiepval Wood, initially their assault was successful and some leading elements even reached as far as the German's second line of defence. However, by the end of the day, as a result of the units on either side of it failing to take their objectives, it had been forced back to the original German front line. It then took until the 26 September 1916, before Thiepval finally fell to the 18th Division. Thiepval remained under Allied occupation until 25 March 1918, when it was lost during the great German offensive, but it was retaken on 24 August by the 17th and 38th (Welsh) Divisions. Mill Road Cemetery was made during the spring of 1917, when the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg line allowed the battlefield to be cleared. At the Armistice, it contained 260 burials, but was greatly enlarged when graves were brought in from the battlefields of Beaumont-Hamel and Thiepval and from smaller cemeteries. There are now 1,304 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.  
 
No. of Identified casualties:

489

 
 

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